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ECD Resources

You may access the latest ECD resources below and filter by theme /resource categories and publication type.

by Prepared for the Global Alliance – Cities 4 Children by Save the Children, IIED, SEI, University of York, University of Portsmouth and IOM

Summary: This evidence into action brief summarises the state of research on the topic of urban air pollution in low- and middle-income countries and its impacts on children, and proposes ideas for action. Air pollution is a major global health challenge to which children are particularly vulnerable. In this briefing, the authors summarise the literature on this topic, focusing on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). There are indoor and outdoor sources of air pollution and these pollutants can remain in the local area or be transported vast distances. Therefore, to reduce air pollution emissions and exposure to pollution, action is needed at local, national and international levels. In many cases, these actions can contribute to achieving multiple other sustainable development goals, including climate change mitigation. An integrated approach to action is needed, involving collaboration with community members, planners and policymakers. 

• Invest in regulatory air pollution monitoring stations and provide training on data management and how to interpret the data. This will highlight the extent of pollution in places where monitoring is lacking.

• Support the development of air quality management systems (including air-quality regulations and standards on emissions) to monitor and reduce air pollution, particularly in urban areas.

• Develop citizen science monitoring programmes to fill the gaps in monitoring. Scientists and community members should work together to answer scientific questions, collect data and co-design awareness-raising campaigns at community level. 

• Work with governments to integrate air pollution into climate change targets. Many sources of greenhouse gases are also sources of air pollutants. LMICS can increase their mitigation ambitions, meet international targets and achieve local development benefits through improved air quality.

by UNICEF

Highlights: Nutritious food in the earliest years of life is the cornerstone of a child’s development. Yet 2 in 3 children between the ages of 6 months to two years are not getting the nutritious diets they need to grow well.

For the first time, UNICEF’s flagship report examines the latest data and evidence on the status, trends and inequities in the diets of young children aged 6–23 months, and the barriers to nutritious, safe and age-appropriate diets.

New analysis presented in the global report shows that the world is failing to feed children well during the time in their lives when it matters most – before two years of age. It draws on a range of evidence sources, including regional analyses and real-life experiences of mothers across different countries, to highlight the most salient barriers to good diets for young children. The report outlines key actions for decision makers to make nutritious diets a reality for every child.

The brief is also available in English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Arabic. For more information and resources, please visit: https://www.unicef.org/reports/fed-to-fail-child-nutrition 

by Plan International and Promundo

Promoting Men’s Engagement in Early Childhood Development: A Programming and Influencing Package includes resources developed for programmes that aim to increase male engagement in nurturing care and early childhood development (ECD), as well as in maternal health and wellbeing. Guidance is provided on how to work with men directly to promote their involvement in the nurturing care, learning and education of their young children. Considerations for working with healthcare providers and community health workers and with communities and leaders is included, as well as tools and templates on policy influencing and social and behaviour change communication campaigns in favour of men’s engagement. 

The document is part of Plan International’s commitment to gender transformative Early Childhood Development work. For more information about the package, click this link: https://plan-international.org/publications/promoting-mens-engagement-early-childhood-development. To find out about training opportunities to support men’s engagement in ECD, please contact Plan International at ECD@plan-international.org. 

by UNICEF EAPRO

Early childhood starting from conception, especially in the first 1,000 days of life, is a period when 90 per cent of brain development takes place. At this crucial time, young children need nurturing care – good health, adequate nutrition, responsive caregiving, early learning and stimulation, physical and emotional security and safety. This early moments in life offer a window of opportunity to boost children’s physical, cognitive, emotional and social development – influencing their readiness to learn in school, to solve problems, to relate to others, and overall mental health and well-being. This ultimately has a significant impact on their adult lives, affecting their ability to earn a living and contribute to their societies.  

COVID-19 threatens this precious opportunity for children in early childhood to develop healthy brains and lives through the disruption of essential health and nutrition services, the suspension of opportunities for early learning, the stress and burden on families and parenting, increased protection risks, and the severe negative impact on families’ household economies. 

Using the latest available evidence, this report summarizes the impact of the pandemic on services essential for young children’s development: For example, that the number of children younger than 5 years visiting community health centres in Viet Nam dropped by 48 per cent; that in Indonesia, more than 50 per cent of households reported not being able to meet their family’s nutritional needs; or that in the Philippines, more than 80 per cent of households experienced a decrease in their household income. Households facing disadvantages before COVID-19 – those with young children, those living in rural and remote areas and low-income households – are in most cases more disproportionally affected by the pandemic. 

For a copy of the case study, please visit: https://www.unicef.org/eap/young-children-and-pandemic 

by UNICEF

Highlights

The climate crisis is a child rights crisis presents the Children’s Climate Risk Index (CCRI), which uses data to generate new global evidence on how many children are currently exposed to climate and environmental hazards, shocks and stresses. A composite index, the CCRI brings together geographical data by analyzing 1.) exposure to climate and environmental hazards, shocks and stresses; and 2.) child vulnerability. The CCRI helps to understand and measure the likelihood of climate and environmental shocks or stresses leading to the erosion of development progress, the deepening of deprivation and/or humanitarian situations affecting children or vulnerable households and groups. 

The summary report is also made available in other langugages, please visit: https://www.unicef.org/reports/climate-crisis-child-rights-crisis

For full report in English, please visit: https://www.unicef.org/media/105376/file/UNICEF-climate-crisis-child-rights-crisis.pdf 

by A Theirworld Report Written by Maysa Jalbout and Katy Bullard

The report highlights how the provision of ECE for refugees is extremely limited in many settings and poorly funded. This is despite the strong evidence base on the impact quality ECE can have to help children manage their trauma and support their short-term and long-term wellbeing and development. Through an extensive literature review and several consultations with experts and practitioners, it examines the landscape of ECE in refugee settings, focusing on professional development available for ECE teachers.

The report provides a roadmap for how we can improve support and professional development to ECE teachers in refugee contexts, with four key avenues:

1 - Make the science of ECD and Learning more accessible

2 - Partner with TVET institutions in refugee settings

3 - Support establishment of communities of practice to foster collaboration and exchange between teachers and practitioners

4 - Translate learning from local communities into broader evidence and resources through a hub or learning lab system.

Please visit https://theirworld.org/resources/detail/supporting-early-childhood-education-teachers-in-refugee-settings for more information. 

See a recording of The Key series event on the topic here: https://theirworld.org/news/key-series-live-supporting-early-learning-teachers-refugee-children 

by LEGO Foundation ( Playfuture- Exploration Team)

Parents want their children to be happy, to learn useful skills, and to be prepared for life. Play can help parents help their children get there. Some parents might not be aware (or might have forgotten) about the power of play to provide children with rich, joyful learning experiences in which they gain valuable skills for life. 

How do we remind them? How do we spread the message?

Lego Foundation and the (Playfutures exploration team) co-created a set of communication guidelines as reminders for communicating with parents and caregivers about their role in engaging children in playful activities.

by Webinar presenters

ARNEC together with UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia (ROSA) are pleased to host the webinar entitled, 'Building Futures: Applying the Early Childhood Development Service Quality Standards for South Asia.'

This webinar aims to: 

(1) Introduce and provide an overview of the ECD Service Quality Standards and Guidelines, including the planning, implementation, mentoring, and monitoring and regulation of these services. 

(2) Encourage countries, especially in South Asia to think about how they can apply these ECD service quality standards given their own contextualized specifications for quality. 

(3) Reinforce how these standards can develop a common understanding of the holistic, integrated and developmentally appropriate nature of quality in ECD among all stakeholders by serving as a common point of reference, which to date has not existed in the South Asian context. 

Click here to access the presentation slides deck. Click here to read the webinar highlights. The recording of the webinar can be accessed from ARNEC's YouTube Channel. 

You can download a copy of the ECD Service Quality Standards for South Asia or visit https://www.unicef.org/rosa/documents/building-futures.  

by UNICEF ROSA

Building Futures: Early childhood development (ECD) service quality standards for South Asia has been developed by the UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia to promote a shared vision for the provision of holistic and comprehensive quality ECD services in the region. These standards are designed with the principles of child rights, equity and inclusion at its core and are intended to assist countries in developing their own standards in cases where they do not already exist; and in countries where standards already exist, it may serve as a key reference when these standards are reviewed and updated. 

The guidance was developed with the recognition that good quality ECD services have the potential to break the vicious cycle of intergenerational poverty and deprivation and to promote social equity, economic growth and prosperity. While the critical role of parents and families as primary caregivers is acknowledged, ECD services should be valued as a public good for which the government must take primary responsibility and accountability.  

We hope that Building Futures will serve as a useful guiding document for all stakeholders who may be working across related sectors involved in policymaking, planning, implementing and overseeing ECD provisions and services for children to ensure they meet quality standards. 

by UNICEF ROSA

Building Futures: Early childhood development (ECD) service quality standards for South Asia has been developed by the UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia to promote a shared vision for the provision of holistic and comprehensive quality ECD services in the region. These standards are designed with the principles of child rights, equity and inclusion at its core and are intended to assist countries in developing their own standards in cases where they do not already exist; and in countries where standards already exist, it may serve as a key reference when these standards are reviewed and updated. 

The guidance was developed with the recognition that good quality ECD services have the potential to break the vicious cycle of intergenerational poverty and deprivation and to promote social equity, economic growth and prosperity. While the critical role of parents and families as primary caregivers is acknowledged, ECD services should be valued as a public good for which the government must take primary responsibility and accountability.  

We hope that Building Futures will serve as a useful guiding document for all stakeholders who may be working across related sectors involved in policymaking, planning, implementing and overseeing ECD provisions and services for children to ensure they meet quality standards. 

by Center on the developing child, Harvard University

In this video, learn more about how play can foster children’s resilience to hardship, and how the complex interactions involved when children play help build their brains.

Please visit: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/play-in-early-childhood-the-role-of-play-in-any-setting/  

by Webinar presenters

ARNEC is pleased to host the webinar series entitled, 'Nurturing care for young children: seeking solutions for addressing disparities heightened by the impact of COVID-19'.

For this webinar series, the thematic focus will be on health and nutrition, early learning, responsive caregiving, and child safety and security, all of which are dimensions of nurturing care. The series will explore the long-term impact of COVID-19 on these nurturing care components, especially on the most vulnerable groups, and draw out innovations and solutions from the countries as they design and implement their recovery and resiliency plans.

ARNEC aims to mobilise the ECD community in the region, particularly practitioners, policy makers, and advocates at the country level, to share community, local and/or country-level solutions which adapt nurturing care practices and ECD programmes to the current realities and long-term effects of COVID-19.

The third webinar in the series focuses on the status and solutions in promoting responsive caregiving for young children in the Asia-Pacific region during and beyond the pandemic. A special emphasis will also be made on building resilience and the positive bond between caregivers and young children through playful parenting in support of pandemic recovery in the home and community.

The following questions shall be explored:

1. What are the long-term effects of COVID-19 on responsive caregiving and parenting? 

2. How do countries and governments strengthen their parenting programs and interventions to respond to the challenges of COVID-19, both short- and long-term?

3. What evidence have we generated to elevate the role of play to support home-based ECD interventions as part of pandemic recovery and to support policy change?

4. What have we learned about parenting education interventions during the pandemic and how do we use these experiences to inform recovery strategies and ECD investments?

5. What evidence-based resources and tools are available to support parents and caregivers as they engage their young children in home-based developmental practices? 

Panellists:

1) Dr Jamie M. Lachman, Senior Research Officer at the University of Oxford Department of Social Policy and Intervention and a research fellow at the University of Glasgow MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit 

2) Dr. Dipu Shakya Education Specialist, UNICEF Nepal

3) Sandipan Paul, Education Specialist, UNICEF Pacific

Moderator: Shikha Jain, Technical Advisor in Plan India and ARNEC Steering Committee member (Core Team Representative)

Click here to read the summary and evaluation report of the webinar. Click here to download the presentation slides deck. The recording of the webinar can be accessed from ARNEC's YouTube Channel

by UNICEF

The scientific community has sounded the alarm. Climate change is a global emergency and we have little more than a decade to undertake the urgent and unprecedented action required to limit global temperatures to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. Beyond that time, the risks of deadly drought, flooding, heatwaves, extreme weather, and poverty will significantly worsen for hundreds of millions of people.

Children will continue to suffer the most under the impacts of climate change. With this in mind, UNICEF has set out to examine current national climate policies/plans to ascertain how child-sensitive2 they are and provide recommendations on how to strengthen the focus on children’s rights, including actionable and measurable results for children.

Despite the many ways climate change impacts them, children are consistently overlooked in the design and content of climate policies and related processes.

In order to overcome this lapse, this report assesses the current landscape of national climate change policies and plans and the degree to which these are child-sensitive. To that end, UNICEF analyzed 160 NDCs3 and 13 NAPs comprising a quantitative and qualitative assessment, based on:

• A systematic search of key words to capture any direct or relevant reference to children and youth in the policy.

• An assessment of the nature of the reference to evaluate whether this was ‘substantive’ or ‘passive’.

by Bernard van Leer Foundation

The Starter Kit is designed to help municipal governments and their partners understand the value of investing in their youngest inhabitants and the people who care for them, and to provide actionable ideas and guidance on how to do so. 

The Starter Kit includes:

• An introduction to early childhood development and why it matters for cities

• An introduction to Urban95

• Ideas for action

• Implementation guidance

by ECWI

This brief seeks to shed light on these questions. Developed by the Early Childhood Workforce Initiative (ECWI), a multi-stakeholder global initiative co-led by Results for Development (R4D) and the International Step by Step Association (ISSA) that works to support and empower those who work directly with young children, the brief highlights common approaches parenting programs are using to continue engaging with families, including transitioning to deliver services virtually and adapting to provide enhanced psychosocial support. We use the five priority actions to support the early childhood workforce outlined in ECWI’s COVID-19 Position Statement as a light guide and explore how some parenting programs are prioritizing the health, safety, and psychosocial well-being, expanding training and guidance, and recognizing the workforce delivering these critical services. Several short case studies provide context and detail to these programs’ efforts and the brief concludes with a set of reflections on the challenges and possibilities ahead.

Author(s): Kavita Hatipoglu with support from Michelle Neuman and Denise Bonsu (R4D) and Konstantina Rentzou and Zorica Trikic (ISSA)

To learn more about the Early Childhood Workforce Initiative (ECWI), please visit https://www.earlychildhoodworkforce.org/  

by SUN Movement Secretariat

SCALING UP NUTRITION TODAY: Looking at progress, building back better

This is the first part of the 2020 report and online portal , celebrating 10 years of SUN. This report will take an innovative approach; the first of four launches, where bite-sized, illustrative stories to spur nutrition action around SUN and beyond will be in the spotlight. There will be more chapters, videos, interactive maps, and graphs showing the progress of the Movement in the coming months.

The report is available in English, en français, y en español. 

Visit https://progress.scalingupnutrition.org/ for more information.  

by Bernard Van Leer Foundation

The global COVID-19 pandemic has underlined the enormous gaps between communities, cities, regions and nation-states. To shape a better future, investing in early childhood needs to remain a priority for all governments and societies. Front and centre of this year’s Early Childhood Matters are resounding calls to action from global leaders and experts to ensure that young children, families, frontline workers and cities continue to thrive.

Early Childhood Matters 2020, out now! Read it at https://earlychildhoodmatters.online/issues/early-childhood-matters-2020/ 

by Webinar presenters

ARNEC Webinar Series 2, No,2.

ARNEC is pleased to host the webinar series entitled, 'Nurturing care for young children: seeking solutions for addressing disparities heightened by the impact of COVID-19'.

For this webinar series, the thematic focus will be on health and nutrition, early learning, responsive caregiving, and child safety and security, all of which are dimensions of nurturing care. The series will explore the long-term impact of COVID-19 on these nurturing care components, especially on the most vulnerable groups, and draw out innovations and solutions from the countries as they design and implement their recovery and resiliency plans.

ARNEC aims to mobilise the ECD community in the region, particularly practitioners, policy makers, and advocates at the country level, to share community, local and/or country-level solutions which adapt nurturing care practices and ECD programmes to the current realities and long-term effects of COVID-19.

This second webinar in the series focuses on the status and solutions in promoting health and nutrition for young children in the Asia-Pacific region during and beyond the pandemic.

The following questions shall be explored:

1. What challenges did the delivery of health and nutrition services including maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) face, particularly for the most vulnerable groups of young children, during the pandemic?

2. How are governments and other partners redesigning health and nutrition policies and programs, including prenatal care, wasting, and stunting interventions, and immunisation to address these needs in the context of the pandemic?

3. What have been the successes in providing health and nutrition services amidst the pandemic? How are the needs of the most vulnerable groups being addressed? What challenges remain?

Panellists:

1) Debora Di Dio, Senior Nutrition and Strategy Adviser at the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement Secretariat, United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland

2) Katharina Elisabeth Kariippanon, Early Career Researcher, School of Health and Society and Early Start, University of Wollongong, Australia

3) Guan Hongyan, Associate Professor, Department of Integrated Early Childhood Development of Capital Institute of Paediatrics in Beijing, China.

4) Dr. Sujeet Ranjan, Executive Director, Coalition for Food and Nutrition Security (CFNS)

5) Dr. Brian Sriprahastuti, Senior Advisor, Executive Office of the President, Republic of Indonesia

Moderator: Jyoti Dhingra, ARNEC National Representative for India

Click here for the summary and evaluation report of the webinar. Click here to download the presentation slides deck. The recording of the webinar can be accessed from ARNEC's YouTube Channel.  

Webinar No.3 - Focus on responsive caregiving.  

by Network impact

This report was commissioned to Network Impact, with support from the Open Society Foundations’ Early Childhood Program and Porticus. With case studies from each network, it shows how ARNEC and the networks on other continents leverage their network mechanisms to bring about changes that impact children, families and those who work in the early years. The report also has a special section on the imperative for ECD networks in COVID-19 response and recovery.

Across over 100 countries in four regions, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the collective capacity for comprehensive cross-sector work advancing Early Childhood Development (ECD). Critical to this accomplishment have been four regional ECD networks (Africa Early Childhood Network (AfECN) , Arab Network for Early Childhood Development (ANECD) , International Step by Step Association (ISSA) and Asia-Pacific Regional Network for Early Childhood (ARNEC)).

These networks are rights-based, with core operating principles dedicated to quality, equity, diversity, inclusiveness, partnerships and accountability. All four are high-performing, with initiatives that have set the stage for advancing ECD work. This report takes a systematic look at how these networks have evolved and what uniquely and collectively positions them to make an impact.

This report builds on interviews with political leaders, senior civil servants, INGO’s, academics and heads of national networks. It identifies the unique advantages of regional networks in the ECD sector, examining how these can be leveraged for greater impact, especially in times of crisis and recovery.

The timing for this work could not be more critical. Migration, climate change, political instability, war and other disasters affect more and more young children. The United Nations has stated that, in order to accelerate progress toward SDG Goal 4, there is an urgent need to bolster local action and significantly improve engagement, coordination and alignment across levels of policy implementation, from local to national to regional and international1. Furthermore, projections for the ongoing impact of COVID-19 by Save the Children and UNICEF estimate that an additional 150 million children are living in multidimensional poverty as a consequence of the pandemic.2

Seven primary outcomes achieved by regional ECD networks

ECD is critical to the development of human capital but, like most multi-sectoral issues, it is both “everyone’s problem and no one’s problem”. Networks are powerful vehicles for achieving ambitious goals and addressing complex multi-sectoral issues. Through their connections, networks can assemble and activate diverse people, gather and communicate vital information, develop and scale innovative solutions, influence policy and practice across sectors and confer legitimacy by engaging actors at all levels. This ability to organize for increased impact is called the network advantage.

Within their regions, each of the networks is well-established, highly visible and influential across a variety of targets, including regional intergovernmental bodies. The cross-sector linkages they facilitate serve as the connective tissue, infrastructure and collective voice for the sector. This network capacity has contributed to outcomes that are not one-time results, but rather a bedrock for greater impact in the sector.

I. MAINSTREAMING ECD AS A PUBLIC SECTOR IMPERATIVE

ECD advocates in each region shifted historical perspectives from an emphasis on childcare and the private sector to the science of human development and the need for public support and investment.

II. BUILDING THE CROSS-SECTOR CONNECTIONS NEEDED FOR ECD TO ADVANCE

Each network has members from different issue sectors, such as health, education, and protection who perform different functions, like policymakers, civil society organizations, academia and practitioners. Through their engagement with regional ECD networks, these members across sectors and functions have built muscle memory for the effective collaboration needed to plan, implement and improve comprehensive national policies and programs. Knowledge is constantly being created or translated by multi-disciplinary teams.

III. CARVING OUT A SPACE FOR GOVERNMENT CONNECTION, CAPACITY BUILDING AND ENGAGEMENT

Decision-makers at different levels play a role in policy formation, implementation and improvement. By connecting ministers from multiple sectors across countries, all four networks have created the space needed to share best practices for effective national-level ECD frameworks, plans and policies.

IV. EXPANDING REACH AND CAPACITY THROUGH NATIONAL NETWORK BUILDING

Developing and sustaining national ECD programs and advancing ECD at the national level relies on having a national infrastructure and capacity. In order to expand the supportive infrastructure in member countries, each regional network has focused on supporting national partners and networks.

V. LINKING THE GROUND TO THE GLOBAL

Interpreting programs, policies and interventions through regional, national and local contexts improves their implementation and effectiveness. Each network works with members to interpret and refine global research into practical methods that work on the ground. Likewise, knowledge and best practices from members in countries and across regions lift up new ideas and models to inform global agenda and action.

VI. CREATING READINESS FOR EFFECTIVE POLICY CHANGE

By mobilizing stakeholders, building advocacy capacity, connecting short-term coalitions and alliances, and supporting successful implementation followed by monitoring for quality and improvement, the regional networks have supported the public and political will needed for sustainable change.

VII. LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR EFFECTIVE CRISIS RESPONSE AND RECOVERY

Network members are able to mobilize as needed, with different configurations of members taking on different tasks to be responsive to new issues and to new challenges or barriers to existing issues. In a global environment rife with conflict, displacement, natural and man-made disasters, and now the COVID-19 pandemic, this adaptive capacity is crucial to ensure that ECD can continue to advance while protecting hard-earned gains across the sector. Because of their adaptive capacity and strong linkages to each other and to members at the national and local levels, the four ECD regional networks are able to respond to crisis by:

  • Scaling solutions quickly and efficiently
  • Shining a light on vulnerable populations
  • Keeping core ECD issues on the agenda
  • Detecting emerging risks early and conducting joint research to identify the extent of impact
  • Providing a two-way pathway for resources and information from the international level to the local level
  • Quickly activating “muscle memory” for collaboration and practice exchange

Looking ahead, the four networks are applying those same capacities to address issues that were critical in ECD before the current pandemic and have now become even more acute:

  • Who is and will become vulnerable?
  • What interventions and solutions worked?
  • What happened to the already fragile ECD workforce?
  • What is needed to build back a better, more integrated system?

Opportunities

By increasing their connections to each other and supporting cross-network collaboration, the kinds of network advantages that have made the four ECD networks successful in their regions have the potential to create powerful global capacity. The following areas of opportunity for regional ECD networks and their investors and partners were identified through this research:

STRENGTHEN CROSS NETWORK INFRASTRUCTURE TO ADDRESS EMERGING ISSUES:

Intentionally creating capacity for cross-network collaboration on topical and emerging issues would yield a stronger infrastructure organized to respond to both global trends and issues that surface from members working in and across communities. Progress is already being made through collaboration on the Early Childhood Workforce Initiative (ECWI), as well as on emerging issues like the impact of climate change on vulnerable children.

STRENGTHEN PEER EXCHANGE TO SHARE BEST PRACTICES FOR OPERATIONS AND STRATEGY

Key areas for cross-network learning include sustainability, engagement and structure as networks evolve over time. In addition, sharing successful strategies for advocacy and strategic communications to build political and public will remains critical for supporting ECD.

EXTEND SCALE AND REACH

Increasing support in each network for intentional national network building and strengthening capacity at the grass-roots level creates deeper infrastructure for the sector and reinforces regional networks’ ability to connect to practitioners, families and communities on the ground. Strengthening linkages between the regions will also help target support to areas in greater need. Lastly, supporting an additional regional ECD network in Latin America would address a key gap in global capacity.

INVEST IN REGIONAL NETWORKS AS INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE ECD SECTOR

Taken together, the four regional ECD networks form a connective infrastructure for the ECD sector. The networks are at a mature stage where they have developed successful strategies and are working toward greater alignment across regions to further bolster the sector. Their work advancing ECD has resulted in both outcomes for the sector - better practices and improved policies and frameworks -- as well as deep knowledge about how to connect the sector for greater impact. Investing in the networks collectively as infrastructure to better connect the ECD sector for impact would build on past successes and scale the network’s ability to drive change.

ENGAGE REGIONAL ECD NETWORKS AS THOUGHT PARTNERS FOR STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT

Networks are able to define and elevate stakeholders who are credible, and connect with voices on the ground which brings authenticity and legitimacy to the work. They can help broaden program design as they connect research with practice, then refine research, improve practices and share back lessons learned. They are also a guide to local and national contexts and players. 

Regional ECD networks can support the thought partnership at the local, national and regional levels that funders need in order for within and across contexts to be better connected in order to serve as a multiplier effect for impact.

by Webinar presenters

ARNEC is pleased to host the webinar series titled, 'Nurturing care for young children: seeking solutions for addressing disparities heightened by the impact of COVID-19'. ARNEC aims to mobilize the ECD community in the region, particularly practitioners, policymakers, and advocates at the country level, to share community, local and/or country-level solutions that adapt nurturing care practices and ECD programmes to the current realities and long-term effects of COVID-19.

This first webinar in the series focuses on early learning opportunities for young children in the Asia-Pacific region during and beyond the pandemic.

The following questions shall be explored:

1. What challenges did the pandemic introduce in the delivery of early learning services, especially for the most vulnerable groups?

2. What are the long-term effects of COVID-19 on early learning opportunities and readiness for school based on experience from other similar crisis situations in the past?

3. What policy changes or developmental interventions are being designed or implemented to support home-, facility-, and institution-based early learning opportunities in the context of pandemic adjustments?

Panellists:

1) Dr Kate Moriarty, Senior Advisor, Strategic Engagement & Dialogue, Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE)

2) Rokhaya Diawara, Education Programme Specialist and Global Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) Adviser at UNESCO headquarters

3) Karma Gayleg, ECCD Specialist, Ministry of Education, Bhutan

4) Nikki Reyes, Planning Officer, ECCD Council of the Philippines

Moderator: Mita Gupta, Early Childhood Development Specialist, UNICEF ROSA

Click here for the summary and evaluation report of the webinar. Click here to download the presentation slides deck. The recording of the webinar is now available on ARNEC's YouTube channel .

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