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ECD Resources
ECD Resources
by Webinar presenters

ARNEC Webinar Series 2, No,2.

ARNEC is pleased to host the webinar series entitled, 'Nurturing care for young children: seeking solutions for addressing disparities heightened by the impact of COVID-19'.

For this webinar series, the thematic focus will be on health and nutrition, early learning, responsive caregiving, and child safety and security, all of which are dimensions of nurturing care. The series will explore the long-term impact of COVID-19 on these nurturing care components, especially on the most vulnerable groups, and draw out innovations and solutions from the countries as they design and implement their recovery and resiliency plans.

ARNEC aims to mobilise the ECD community in the region, particularly practitioners, policy makers, and advocates at the country level, to share community, local and/or country-level solutions which adapt nurturing care practices and ECD programmes to the current realities and long-term effects of COVID-19.

This second webinar in the series focuses on the status and solutions in promoting health and nutrition for young children in the Asia-Pacific region during and beyond the pandemic.

The following questions shall be explored:

1. What challenges did the delivery of health and nutrition services including maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) face, particularly for the most vulnerable groups of young children, during the pandemic?

2. How are governments and other partners redesigning health and nutrition policies and programs, including prenatal care, wasting, and stunting interventions, and immunisation to address these needs in the context of the pandemic?

3. What have been the successes in providing health and nutrition services amidst the pandemic? How are the needs of the most vulnerable groups being addressed? What challenges remain?

Panellists:

1) Debora Di Dio, Senior Nutrition and Strategy Adviser at the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement Secretariat, United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland

2) Katharina Elisabeth Kariippanon, Early Career Researcher, School of Health and Society and Early Start, University of Wollongong, Australia

3) Guan Hongyan, Associate Professor, Department of Integrated Early Childhood Development of Capital Institute of Paediatrics in Beijing, China.

4) Dr. Sujeet Ranjan, Executive Director, Coalition for Food and Nutrition Security (CFNS)

5) Dr. Brian Sriprahastuti, Senior Advisor, Executive Office of the President, Republic of Indonesia

Moderator: Jyoti Dhingra, ARNEC National Representative for India

Click here for the summary and evaluation report of the webinar. Click here to download the presentation slides deck. The recording of the webinar will be made available on ARNEC's YouTube channel soon.

ECD Resources
by Network impact

This report was commissioned to Network Impact, with support from the Open Society Foundations’ Early Childhood Program and Porticus. With case studies from each network, it shows how ARNEC and the networks on other continents leverage their network mechanisms to bring about changes that impact children, families and those who work in the early years. The report also has a special section on the imperative for ECD networks in COVID-19 response and recovery.

Across over 100 countries in four regions, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the collective capacity for comprehensive cross-sector work advancing Early Childhood Development (ECD). Critical to this accomplishment have been four regional ECD networks (Africa Early Childhood Network (AfECN) , Arab Network for Early Childhood Development (ANECD) , International Step by Step Association (ISSA) and Asia-Pacific Regional Network for Early Childhood (ARNEC)).

These networks are rights-based, with core operating principles dedicated to quality, equity, diversity, inclusiveness, partnerships and accountability. All four are high-performing, with initiatives that have set the stage for advancing ECD work. This report takes a systematic look at how these networks have evolved and what uniquely and collectively positions them to make an impact.

This report builds on interviews with political leaders, senior civil servants, INGO’s, academics and heads of national networks. It identifies the unique advantages of regional networks in the ECD sector, examining how these can be leveraged for greater impact, especially in times of crisis and recovery.

The timing for this work could not be more critical. Migration, climate change, political instability, war and other disasters affect more and more young children. The United Nations has stated that, in order to accelerate progress toward SDG Goal 4, there is an urgent need to bolster local action and significantly improve engagement, coordination and alignment across levels of policy implementation, from local to national to regional and international1. Furthermore, projections for the ongoing impact of COVID-19 by Save the Children and UNICEF estimate that an additional 150 million children are living in multidimensional poverty as a consequence of the pandemic.2

Seven primary outcomes achieved by regional ECD networks

ECD is critical to the development of human capital but, like most multi-sectoral issues, it is both “everyone’s problem and no one’s problem”. Networks are powerful vehicles for achieving ambitious goals and addressing complex multi-sectoral issues. Through their connections, networks can assemble and activate diverse people, gather and communicate vital information, develop and scale innovative solutions, influence policy and practice across sectors and confer legitimacy by engaging actors at all levels. This ability to organize for increased impact is called the network advantage.

Within their regions, each of the networks is well-established, highly visible and influential across a variety of targets, including regional intergovernmental bodies. The cross-sector linkages they facilitate serve as the connective tissue, infrastructure and collective voice for the sector. This network capacity has contributed to outcomes that are not one-time results, but rather a bedrock for greater impact in the sector.

I. MAINSTREAMING ECD AS A PUBLIC SECTOR IMPERATIVE

ECD advocates in each region shifted historical perspectives from an emphasis on childcare and the private sector to the science of human development and the need for public support and investment.

II. BUILDING THE CROSS-SECTOR CONNECTIONS NEEDED FOR ECD TO ADVANCE

Each network has members from different issue sectors, such as health, education, and protection who perform different functions, like policymakers, civil society organizations, academia and practitioners. Through their engagement with regional ECD networks, these members across sectors and functions have built muscle memory for the effective collaboration needed to plan, implement and improve comprehensive national policies and programs. Knowledge is constantly being created or translated by multi-disciplinary teams.

III. CARVING OUT A SPACE FOR GOVERNMENT CONNECTION, CAPACITY BUILDING AND ENGAGEMENT

Decision-makers at different levels play a role in policy formation, implementation and improvement. By connecting ministers from multiple sectors across countries, all four networks have created the space needed to share best practices for effective national-level ECD frameworks, plans and policies.

IV. EXPANDING REACH AND CAPACITY THROUGH NATIONAL NETWORK BUILDING

Developing and sustaining national ECD programs and advancing ECD at the national level relies on having a national infrastructure and capacity. In order to expand the supportive infrastructure in member countries, each regional network has focused on supporting national partners and networks.

V. LINKING THE GROUND TO THE GLOBAL

Interpreting programs, policies and interventions through regional, national and local contexts improves their implementation and effectiveness. Each network works with members to interpret and refine global research into practical methods that work on the ground. Likewise, knowledge and best practices from members in countries and across regions lift up new ideas and models to inform global agenda and action.

VI. CREATING READINESS FOR EFFECTIVE POLICY CHANGE

By mobilizing stakeholders, building advocacy capacity, connecting short-term coalitions and alliances, and supporting successful implementation followed by monitoring for quality and improvement, the regional networks have supported the public and political will needed for sustainable change.

VII. LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR EFFECTIVE CRISIS RESPONSE AND RECOVERY

Network members are able to mobilize as needed, with different configurations of members taking on different tasks to be responsive to new issues and to new challenges or barriers to existing issues. In a global environment rife with conflict, displacement, natural and man-made disasters, and now the COVID-19 pandemic, this adaptive capacity is crucial to ensure that ECD can continue to advance while protecting hard-earned gains across the sector. Because of their adaptive capacity and strong linkages to each other and to members at the national and local levels, the four ECD regional networks are able to respond to crisis by:

  • Scaling solutions quickly and efficiently
  • Shining a light on vulnerable populations
  • Keeping core ECD issues on the agenda
  • Detecting emerging risks early and conducting joint research to identify the extent of impact
  • Providing a two-way pathway for resources and information from the international level to the local level
  • Quickly activating “muscle memory” for collaboration and practice exchange

Looking ahead, the four networks are applying those same capacities to address issues that were critical in ECD before the current pandemic and have now become even more acute:

  • Who is and will become vulnerable?
  • What interventions and solutions worked?
  • What happened to the already fragile ECD workforce?
  • What is needed to build back a better, more integrated system?

Opportunities

By increasing their connections to each other and supporting cross-network collaboration, the kinds of network advantages that have made the four ECD networks successful in their regions have the potential to create powerful global capacity. The following areas of opportunity for regional ECD networks and their investors and partners were identified through this research:

STRENGTHEN CROSS NETWORK INFRASTRUCTURE TO ADDRESS EMERGING ISSUES:

Intentionally creating capacity for cross-network collaboration on topical and emerging issues would yield a stronger infrastructure organized to respond to both global trends and issues that surface from members working in and across communities. Progress is already being made through collaboration on the Early Childhood Workforce Initiative (ECWI), as well as on emerging issues like the impact of climate change on vulnerable children.

STRENGTHEN PEER EXCHANGE TO SHARE BEST PRACTICES FOR OPERATIONS AND STRATEGY

Key areas for cross-network learning include sustainability, engagement and structure as networks evolve over time. In addition, sharing successful strategies for advocacy and strategic communications to build political and public will remains critical for supporting ECD.

EXTEND SCALE AND REACH

Increasing support in each network for intentional national network building and strengthening capacity at the grass-roots level creates deeper infrastructure for the sector and reinforces regional networks’ ability to connect to practitioners, families and communities on the ground. Strengthening linkages between the regions will also help target support to areas in greater need. Lastly, supporting an additional regional ECD network in Latin America would address a key gap in global capacity.

INVEST IN REGIONAL NETWORKS AS INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE ECD SECTOR

Taken together, the four regional ECD networks form a connective infrastructure for the ECD sector. The networks are at a mature stage where they have developed successful strategies and are working toward greater alignment across regions to further bolster the sector. Their work advancing ECD has resulted in both outcomes for the sector - better practices and improved policies and frameworks -- as well as deep knowledge about how to connect the sector for greater impact. Investing in the networks collectively as infrastructure to better connect the ECD sector for impact would build on past successes and scale the network’s ability to drive change.

ENGAGE REGIONAL ECD NETWORKS AS THOUGHT PARTNERS FOR STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT

Networks are able to define and elevate stakeholders who are credible, and connect with voices on the ground which brings authenticity and legitimacy to the work. They can help broaden program design as they connect research with practice, then refine research, improve practices and share back lessons learned. They are also a guide to local and national contexts and players. 

Regional ECD networks can support the thought partnership at the local, national and regional levels that funders need in order for within and across contexts to be better connected in order to serve as a multiplier effect for impact.

ECD Resources
by Webinar presenters

ARNEC is pleased to host the webinar series titled, 'Nurturing care for young children: seeking solutions for addressing disparities heightened by the impact of COVID-19'. ARNEC aims to mobilize the ECD community in the region, particularly practitioners, policymakers, and advocates at the country level, to share community, local and/or country-level solutions that adapt nurturing care practices and ECD programmes to the current realities and long-term effects of COVID-19.

This first webinar in the series focuses on early learning opportunities for young children in the Asia-Pacific region during and beyond the pandemic.

The following questions shall be explored:

1. What challenges did the pandemic introduce in the delivery of early learning services, especially for the most vulnerable groups?

2. What are the long-term effects of COVID-19 on early learning opportunities and readiness for school based on experience from other similar crisis situations in the past?

3. What policy changes or developmental interventions are being designed or implemented to support home-, facility-, and institution-based early learning opportunities in the context of pandemic adjustments?

Panellists:

1) Dr Kate Moriarty, Senior Advisor, Strategic Engagement & Dialogue, Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE)

2) Rokhaya Diawara, Education Programme Specialist and Global Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) Adviser at UNESCO headquarters

3) Karma Gayleg, ECCD Specialist, Ministry of Education, Bhutan

4) Nikki Reyes, Planning Officer, ECCD Council of the Philippines

Moderator: Mita Gupta, Early Childhood Development Specialist, UNICEF ROSA

Click here for the summary and evaluation report of the webinar. Click here to download the presentation slides deck. The recording of the webinar is now available on ARNEC's YouTube channel .

ECD Resources
by World Vision and ODI

The world is facing multiple challenges with huge impacts on humanity, requiring action from citizens, policy-makers, and activists. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and169 targets demonstrate the scale and ambition of the current global agenda. Many of these issues are interconnected, as global challenges can be mutually reinforcing. However, this also means that they can be solved synergistically, with actions in one area contributing to positive results in others.

This working paper focuses on two of these critical global challenges: violence against children and climate change. The links between the two are not always obvious, but they exist and are significant in terms of both causes and solutions.

The Key messages include:

  • The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) include the mitigation of both climate change and violence against children. Given the links between these two problems, actions that address both will be more effective in achieving these goals.
  • Disaster risk reduction planning that considers the risks of violence against children arising from climate-related shocks will enable more responsive mechanisms to mitigate impacts on children.
  • Children and adolescents are crucial agents of change in the global fight against climate change.They are also aware of the climate-related risks they face, so involving them in solutions will generate positive results.

For more information, please visit : 

https://www.wvi.org/publications/climate-change/ending-violence-against-children-while-addressing-global-climate-crisis

ECD Events
calendar
21 January 2021

Join us as we launch the 2020 ARNEC Connections with the theme Ensuring the well-being of young children amidst environmental risks in the Asia-Pacific region! 

The 2020 edition explores the nexus between ECD and the physical environment, including the environmental risks young children are exposed to in the region.

The hour-long launch will feature insights from experts on the vulnerabilities young children experience under unhealthy environments and changing climates in the region, as well as the multisectoral, holistic approaches required to ensure nurturing and sustainable environments for them.

Register now! Advance registration is required to participate in the event. 

More details on the programme and profiles of presenters will be released soon. Visit our Facebook page for updates! 

calendar
26 - 28 February 2021

ECCE Council, Malaysia organizes International Virtual Early Childhood Education Conference. 

Early bird registration ends on 14 Jan 2021! 

For more information on programmes and registration fees, please visit: http://eccecouncil.org/international-virtual-conference/  

Register now!  

calendar
11 January 2021

Register now!  

ARNEC Webinar Series 2, No,2. 

ARNEC is pleased to host the webinar series entitled, 'Nurturing care for young children: seeking solutions for addressing disparities heightened by the impact of COVID-19'.

For this webinar series, the thematic focus will be on health and nutrition, early learning, responsive caregiving, and child safety and security, all of which are dimensions of nurturing care. The series will explore the long-term impact of COVID-19 on these nurturing care components, especially on the most vulnerable groups, and draw out innovations and solutions from the countries as they design and implement their recovery and resiliency plans.

ARNEC aims to mobilise the ECD community in the region, particularly practitioners, policy makers, and advocates at the country level, to share community, local and/or country-level solutions which adapt nurturing care practices and ECD programmes to the current realities and long-term effects of COVID-19.

This second webinar in the series focuses on the status and solutions in promoting health and nutrition for young children in the Asia-Pacific region during and beyond the pandemic.

The following questions shall be explored:

1. What challenges did the delivery of health and nutrition services including maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) face, particularly for the most vulnerable groups of young children, during the pandemic?

2. How are governments and other partners redesigning health and nutrition policies and programs, including prenatal care, wasting, and stunting interventions, and immunisation to address these needs in the context of the pandemic?

3. What have been the successes in providing health and nutrition services amidst the pandemic? How are the needs of the most vulnerable groups being addressed? What challenges remain?

Panellists:

1) Debora Di Dio, Senior Nutrition and Strategy Adviser at the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement Secretariat, United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland

2) Katharina Elisabeth Kariippanon, Early Career Researcher, School of Health and Society and Early Start, University of Wollongong, Australia

3) Guan Hongyan, Associate Professor, Department of Integrated Early Childhood Development of Capital Institute of Paediatrics in Beijing, China.

4) Dr. Sujeet Ranjan, Executive Director, Coalition for Food and Nutrition Security (CFNS)

5) Dr. Brian Sriprahastuti, Senior Advisor, Executive Office of the President, Republic of Indonesia

Moderator: Jyoti Dhingra, ARNEC National Representative for India

View the full webinar announcement here.  

Strategic Partners
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